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    1. LinkedIn’s leading ladies talk PR, tech, and changing the world

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      As a career professional, can you imagine a world without LinkedIn? It would be like trying to function without a pencil in a one-room schoolhouse. Ridiculous.

      LinkedIn has essentially replaced the need for business cards, since you can basically use it as a modern day Rolodex. #Connections.

      Furthermore, if you’ve ever looked for a job, hired people, or simply wanted to showcase your savvy skills so that others (maybe recruiters, perhaps former love interests) can continually watch you rise to super star status you’ve certainly benefitted from it. #Compete

      More recently, particularly for those of us who love to hear ourselves speak, the LinkedIn publishing platform is usurping established digital incumbents as a viable channel for sharing news, thoughts, and anything in between (minus the annoying cat photos and celebrity rants). #Content

      Because I’m a HUGE fan on LinkedIn, not only as a utility for my every day professional life, but also as a company, I was thrilled to sit down with a few of my favorite “LinkedIn Ladies” (Sarah Clatterbuck, Erica Lockheimer, and Kenly Walker) to talk PR, tech, and how they are generally making the world a better place.

      Here are a few highlights from the interview, which I highly recommend you listen to below.

      1. Hear about some of the exciting #WomenInTech initiatives going on at the company including World Pitch on June 24th and 25th.

      2. What recent acquisition will enable learning? According to Forbes it may have been the best acquisition money could buy.

      3. Umm, this one’s really important: learn how to make your profile “Anonymous” so people can’t see you’re stalking them. It’s a little hidden, so it’s not you!

      4. Did you know…Journalists actually often do preliminary research on LinkedIn, and CEOs appreciate that journalists do their “due diligence” and are often more willing to chat.

      5. Sarah Clatterbuck (Director of Web Development) tells us how to best use LinkedIn as a recruiting tool.

      6. Kenly Walker (PR) gives tips on using LinkedIn as an “owned media channel” for company news.

      7. Learn about the modernized Girl Scouts and what they’re doing with STEM: “from cookies to computer science.” It’s not your mom’s Girl Scouts!

      8. Want to know what a “Happy Path” is? Erica Lockheimer (Director of Engineering Growth) tells all.

      That’s just the tip of the iceberg…there’s so so soooo much more…

      Be sure to check out  the full interview and give yourself a few more reasons to HEART the world’s leading business-oriented social networking service.

    2. How to Think About Gender Inequality and Diversity in Tech

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      Last fall I attended the very fashionable and mildly geek-chic Anita Borg Institute’s Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing event, now home to “Nadella-gate.”

      There, I observed a sea of 8,000 women aged eighteen to eighty who were there for one express purpose: to understand the technology landscape and future of computing and how it may affect their respective lives–career and otherwise.

      My thinking around gender inequality (in this particular case, with regard to the technology industry) tends to align with GoDaddy CTO Elissa Murphy’s thinking when we sat down at the conference to discuss gender gaps, among other things: “I never got the memo that I wasn’t supposed to go to the computer lab, or play baseball, or do any other thing I wanted to do. Being a girl never had anything to do with it.”

      On the flip side, as Erica Lockheimer, Director of Engineering Growth at LinkedIn, pointed out: “When you talk to younger generations, the stereotypes about being a girl in computing still exist: we’re introverted geeks who lack social skills and just want to stare at a computer screen all day. It’s in everything from the things they watch on TV to what they see on the Internet.”

      What is the truth about why more girls don’t pursue engineering careers? Is it because men are holding them back? Is it because “the system” (that beast! The thing we blame when we can’t identify a culprit) is sending the wrong messages?

      If we put gender aside for a moment, and focus on the benefits of diversity within industries and organizations, the thinking ever so slightly shifts into a solutions-based paradigm. The by-product of this modification is a distinct emphasis on a person’s love for a particular subject matter, area of expertise, or knowledge base that allows them to thrive. Along with continued discourse and a general awareness of “unconscious bias,” I am almost certain that if we focused on the following things, we would see seismic shifts in terms of the number of people (who happen to be female) who pursue careers in engineering and other technical roles.

      EDUCATION: Thinking about computing education as art, rather than just science

      It’s very easy to get stuck in our thinking that pursuing a degree in computer science means one is only adept with numbers. But the truth is that “coding” is actually very similar to learning a language; a language that happens to be numbers based. When curricula systematically approach engineering from the standpoint of science or math, they fundamentally deny those with a propensity for learning languages or a passion for art the opportunity to pursue this path. We have done a disservice by talking about STEM in terms of left-brains, rather than a creative pursuit that requires a different set of skills, often soft skills, in order to master it.

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